Welcome

“2% IS NOT ENOUGH”



Our Vision

By 2020, The Fellowship will help school districts and charter networks recruit and retain 1,000 Black male educators in Philadelphia public schools. Every child in the Greater Philadelphia region will have access and/or experience the high impact leadership of a highly effective Black male educator.

 

Our Mission

The Fellowship exists to address the development, recruitment and retention of Black male educators in the Greater Philadelphia Region.
We aim to do this through:
  • High school to career pipeline: We hope to expand a comprehensive pipeline for Black male candidates to explore the teaching and school leadership profession. Students are not often exposed to the benefit of emerging their high impact leadership through the classroom and education spaces. We will elevate the teaching profession through the lens of social justice leadership and highly effective teaching for school excellence and student achievement.
  • Advocacy with policy makers: We aim to amplify the voices and leverage the experiences of Black male educators. We intend to serve as effective change agents that can wield a strong influence in regional and national educational policies that impact our schools, students, and communities.
  • Regional Black Male Educator Convenings: We know that the power of networking is real and can be a huge lever in amplifying our voices, sharing concerns and problem-solving around it, and collectively developing ourselves as practitioners. Our collective experiences are to be shared and used to grow and strengthen our work-accelerating student achievement in our communities.





Perhaps if schools can get better at attracting and retaining male teachers of color, they might also be places where historically marginalized and traditionally at-risk groups could begin to thrive, too.

Research & Statistics

Only 2% of the 3.1 million public school teachers in the US are Black males.

Travis J. Bristol- In the fall of 2014, students of color became the majority of all U.S. public school students (Associated Press, 2014). At the same time, however, recent data show less than 15 percent of the nation’s teachers are Black or Latino (Duncan, 2011). Considering that students of color, especially young men, exhibit great in-school and out-of-school challenges (Bristol, 2015), it is even more troubling that 2 percent of all U.S. teachers are Latino men (Maxwell,2012), less than 2 percent are Black men (Duncan, 2011), and only 0.5 percent are Asian men (Toldson, 2013). Perhaps if schools can get better at attracting and retaining male teachers of color, they might also be places where historically marginalized and traditionally at-risk groups could begin to thrive, too.

Philadelphia-specific statistics:

  • Only 4.56% within the School District of Philadelphia are Black male teachers (394 of 8,639 as of April 2014).
  • School District of Philadelphia is the fourth lowest ranked district in the country for Black male graduation rates.
  • Nationally 52% of Black males graduate high school in four years vs 58% of Latino and 72% of White males.
  • (4th graders) 8% are at or above proficiency levels in reading and 13% in Math
  • (18yrs and older) 42.7% hold a high school diploma, GED, or equivalent
  • (25yrs and older) 15.7% hold an Associate’s degree or higher
  • $24,706 is the median household income of households headed by black males

NEW RELEASE: Philadelphia’s “Black Male Educators Report” – Recommendations & Call to Action

The Fellowship to release Philadelphia’s “The Black Male Educators Report” on May 15, 2016. This report will contain Year 1 data, findings and recommendations for key partners, stakeholders and regional “call to action” for school-year 2016-17.




Contact Us and Donate

Headquarters

319 W. Chelten Avenue, Annex A Philadelphia, PA 19144
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